ACT 1: One to One Counselling

Hours: 45 hours

Credits: 3 credits

 Course Prerequisite:  Community Addictions Services Certificate

 Professional Certification

Graduates of this course may be eligible for certification through the Canadian Council of Professional Certification (CCPC) in cooperation with the Canadian Counsellors and Therapists.

 Course Description

This course will give students instruction to develop an understanding of human development (life cycles), and increased knowledge and skill development to become more effective counsellor. Students will also be given time in class to practice skill development for one-to-one counselling.

 Purpose of Course

This course is intended to do the following:

  • Provide students with general knowledge and skills in the areas of individual development and functioning, and interpersonal helping.
  • Provide students with an opportunity to demonstrate beginning skills in doing individual assessments and supportive counselling, and to create conditions for effective referrals to specialists.
  • Broaden the student’s understanding of individual dynamics and functioning, and to provide an opportunity for enhanced counsellor skill development applicable to the participant’s home community.

 Course Expectations

During this course, students will:

  • Examine their personal attitudes, feelings, and values about individuals in order to separate them from the attitudes, feelings, and values of the client, the agency, and the community.
  • Consider the individual in need as a person having resources, skills and knowledge that have assisted in their functioning thus far.
  • Actively participate in the in-class discussions and activities, and will complete all class related assignments including the assessment.
  • Develop and enhance their interpersonal relationship, assessment and helping skills through role-play and observation, reading, supervision, ongoing professional development, and, as needed, their own personal therapy.

 COURSE OBJECTIVES

The objectives may be thought of as a road map of the learning journey ahead. It indicates what the students can expect to learn during the course. It can also be used as a study guide when the students review what has been learned prior to completing the written assessment at the end of the course. The written assessment at the end of the course will be based on these objectives.

When students have completed this course, they will be able to:

  1. Discuss ethics for addictions counsellors.
  2. Define one-to-one counselling.
  3. Describe how the emerging issues may impact the one-to-one counselling process.
  4. Define a contract.
  5. Describe the characteristics of a counselling contract.
  6. Describe the benefits of a counselling contract.
  7. Discuss the difference between crisis intervention, counselling, and therapy.
  8. Discuss the concepts of content, process, transference and counter transference.
  9. Name the five developmental stages of the individual and describe tasks to be achieved in each stage.
  10. Discuss a modified model of Maslow’s Hierarchy of human needs.
  11. Discuss the benefits of using the modified Maslow model to assess a client.
  12. Discuss Erikson’s Stages of Development.
  13. Identify the guidelines for giving feedback and the benefits of receiving feedback.
  14. Describe the Johari Window and how it can be used as a counselling tool.
  15. Identify three Do’s and three Don’ts of effective listening.
  16. Discuss how the Awareness Wheel can be used as a counselling tool.
  17. Describe the Structured Counselling Model.
  18. Discuss the pros and cons of the Structured Counselling Model.
  19. Define the concept of defense mechanisms, describe defense mechanisms, and discuss how they can be helpful as well as unhelpful.
  20. Describe and list examples of what is meant by primary and secondary emotions (layering).
  21. Describe the ten main counselling skills.

Instructional Methods

  • Lecture
  • Large and small group work and discussion
  • Skill building through small group and individual exercises and role plays
  • Individual and small group homework assignments and readings
  • Personal journaling
  • Support groups
  • Written assessment

 Course Evaluation

  • Attendance 10 %
  • Participation 10 %
  • Journaling 5 %
  • Support Group 15 %
  • Written Exam 60 %

In this course, 60 % of the final grade will be based on the written exam score, and 10 % will be based on attendance, 10 % will be based on participation, 15 % will be based on required support group, and 5 % will be based on journaling.  The written assessment or test will consist of a series of multiple-choice questions which are based on the learning objectives for the course. There may be one or more question for each learning objective. This means that the students may be tested on any part of the content contained in the Student Manual and accompanying course material.

Attendance and punctuality in all aspects of training are mandatory including assigned evening support group meetings. Attendance and participation marks are forfeited as follows:

  • Absence for each half hour – 1 mark deducted from participation.
  • Absence from Cultural Resource Evening – 5 marks deducted from participation. The required hours for this course are 45 contact hours.

 Course Materials

  • Student Manual, One to One Counselling
  • Small, Jacquelyn. Becoming Naturally Therapeutic: A Return to the True Essence of Toronto, ON: Bantam Books, 1990.

ACT 2: Family Dynamics

Hours: 45 hours

Credits: 3 credits

 Course Prerequisite:  Community Addictions Training Certificate.

 Professional Certification

Graduates of this course may be eligible for certification through the Canadian Council of Professional Certification (CCPC) in cooperation with the Canadian Counsellors and Therapists.

 Course Description

This course will provide students with instruction on theories of family dynamics, systems and development. Students will be given opportunities in class to practice beginning skill development in a family counselling session through role-play exercises.

 Purpose of Course

This course is intended to do the following:

  • To provide students with general background knowledge on family development and functioning, and on family systems interactions, focusing on:
  • the family as a personal experience;
  • the internal dynamics and life cycle of the family; and
  • the family’s relationship to its outside environment or community (the ecology of the family).
  • To provide students with an opportunity to demonstrate beginning skills in doing family assessments, supportive counselling of families and individuals within a family context, and to create conditions for effective referrals to family therapy
  • To broaden the student’s understanding of family dynamics and functioning, compared to CAT 3: Family Disease, and will provide an opportunity for enhanced counsellor skill development and application to the home community.
  • To provide a more general focus on family functioning with less emphasis on addictions, as had been the focus in the Community Addictions Training series.
  • To provide an introduction, as in ACT 1: One-to-One Counselling, to some models which may help students better understand the families with which they are working as well as their own families.
  • To provide an introduction to concepts and terms specific to family systems theory. The ideas behind these terms may be familiar to students, as they draw from an Aboriginal understanding of connectedness: All My Relations, and the Medicine
  • To provide a beginning skill development in doing family assessments and referrals for family treatment, or to do a family assessment with an individual. The goal of this course, however, is not to produce family therapists.

 Course Expectations

During this course, students will:

  • Examine their personal attitudes, feelings and values about families in order to separate these out from those of other systems: the client’s, agencies, and
  • Consider the family from both an Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal context.
  • Actively participate in the in-class discussions and activities, and complete all class related assignments including the assessment.
  • Develop and enhance their family assessment skills through role-plays, reading, supervision, ongoing professional development and, as needed, their own personal

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The objectives may be thought of as a road map of the learning journey ahead. It indicates what the students can expect to learn during the course. It can also be used as a study guide when the students review what has been learned prior to completing the written assessment at the end of the course. The written assessment at the end of the course will be based on these objectives.

When the students have completed this course, they will be able to:

  1. Define family dynamics.
  2. Define and give an example of each of the following: family system, family subsystem, closed system, open system.
  3. Draw and discuss their family genogram and describe the uses of a genogram.
  4. Describe the characteristics of a functional family.
  5. Describe ways people deal with differences in their families.
  6. Discuss how emerging issues are addressed within a family.
  7. Draw an eco-map showing a positive-supportive interaction and a destructive interaction and describe the benefits of using an eco-map when working with families and individuals.
  8. Name the six stages of the Family Life Cycle model, describe one task in each stage and describe the benefits of using it with families and individuals.
  9. Define differentiation and describe the characteristics of a differentiated person.
  10. Discuss the concepts of clear, masked, direct and displaced communication.
  11. Define or describe the following concepts from family systems theory:
  • Homeostasis
  • Boundaries
  • Circular and linear causality
  • Family rules
  • Closeness and distance
  • Triangulation
  • Family roles
  • Birth order and gender.

 Instructional Methods

  • Lecture
  • Large and small group work and discussion
  • Skill building through small group and individual exercises and role plays
  • Individual and small group homework assignments and readings
  • Personal journaling
  • Support groups
  • Written assessment

 Course Evaluation

  • Attendance 10 %
  • Participation 10 %
  • Journaling 5 %
  • Support Group 15 %
  • Written Exam 60 %

In this course, 60 % of the final grade will be based on the written exam score, and 10 % will be based on attendance, 10 % will be based on participation, 15 % will be based on required support group, and 5 % will be based on journaling.  The written assessment or test will consist of a series of multiple-choice questions which are based on the learning objectives for the course. There may be one or more question for each learning objective. This means that the students may be tested on any part of the content contained in the Student Manual and accompanying course material.

Attendance and punctuality in all aspects of training are mandatory including assigned evening support group meetings. Attendance and participation marks are forfeited as follows:

  • Absence for each half hour – 1 mark deducted from participation.
  • Absence from Cultural Resource Evening – 5 marks deducted from participation. The required hours for this course are 45 contact hours.

Course Materials

  • Student Manual, Family Dynamics

 Suggested Reading Material

  • Bradshaw, John. Bradshaw On: The Family. A New Way of Creating Solid Self-Esteem. Revised Edition. Deerfield Beach, FL: Health Communications, Inc., 1996.
  • Richardson, Ronald W. Family Ties That Bind: A Self-Help Guide to Change Through Family of Origin Therapy. Vancouver, BC: International Self-Counsel Press Ltd., 1995.

ACT 3: Group Dynamics

Hours: 45 hours

Credits: 3 credits

Course Prerequisite: Community Addictions Training Certificate.

Professional Certification

Graduates of this course may be eligible for certification through the Canadian Council of Professional Certification (CCPC) in cooperation with the Canadian Counsellors and Therapists.

Course Description

This course will provide instruction to help students understand how groups function.  Observation of the training group itself during the week of training enhances the learning process.

Purpose of Course

This course is intended to do the following:

  • To provide students with general background knowledge on group development and functioning, focusing on:
  • Group involvement as a personal experience;
  • The internal dynamics and developmental cycle of the group;
  • The relationship of group dynamics to ACT 1: One to One Counselling, and ACT 2: Family Dynamics.
  • To provide students with an opportunity to learn, discuss and demonstrate introductory skills in designing, planning and leading both task and supportive counselling groups.
  • To build on ACT 1 and 2 to discover how some of the earlier models, such as stages of development, roles, and needs, apply to groups.
  • To provide an introduction to different models and concepts to help students design, plan and encourage successful groups.
  • To provide an introduction to instruments used to assess leadership and group membership skills and attitudes.
  • To begin skills development in observing and understanding group dynamics.

The goal of this course, however, is not to produce group therapists.

 Course Expectations

During this course students will:

  • Examine their personal attitudes, feelings and values about groups in order to separate these out from those of other systems: clients, agency, or communities.
  • Consider groups from both an Aboriginal and non Aboriginal context.
  • Actively participate in the in-class discussions, activities, and will complete all class related assignments, including the written assessment.
  • Develop and enhance their group assessment skills through role-plays, reading, supervision, ongoing professional development and, as needed, their own personal therapy.

Course Objectives

The objectives may be thought of as a road map of the learning journey ahead.  They indicate what the students can expect to learn during the course. They can also be used as a study guide when the students review what has been learned prior to completing the written assessment at the end of the course. The written assessment at the end of the course will be based on these objectives.

When the students have completed this course, they will be able to:

  1. Define group dynamics.
  2. Discuss the following types of groups: open and closed; homogeneous and heterogeneous; process (relationship) and task.
  3. Identify the six factors to consider when starting a group.
  4. Discuss the four major purposes of groups based on the Medicine Wheel.
  5. Identify the four stages of development in a process (relationship) group and describe the task(s) or issue(s) to be resolved in each stage.
  6. Identify the four stages of development in a task group and describe the task(s) or issue(s) to be resolved in each stage.
  7. Discuss categories of group roles and identify examples of each category.
  8. Identify examples of group roles and describe the effect of these roles on the group’s development.
  9. Name and discuss the four basic needs of group members.
  10. Discuss strategies to help the group resolve its developmental tasks.
  11. Identify the impact emerging issues may have on the dynamics within various groups.
  12. Describe the personal characteristics and skills of an effective leader.
  13. Describe the benefits of conflict.
  14. Explain the five parts of the conflict management grid.
  15. Identify fears leading to resistance.
  16. Name the two intents of behavior and explain the consequences of each.

Instructional Methods

  • Lecture
  • Large and small group work and discussion
  • Skill building through small group and individual exercises and role plays
  • Individual and small group homework assignments and readings
  • Personal journaling
  • Support groups
  • Written assessment

 Course Evaluation

  • Attendance 10 %
  • Participation 10 %
  • Journaling   5 %
  • Support Group 15 %
  • Written Exam 60 %

In this course, 60 % of the final grade will be based on the written exam score, and 10 % will be based on attendance, 10 % will be based on participation, 15 % will be based on required support group, and 5 % will be based on journaling.  The written assessment or test will consist of a series of multiple-choice questions which are based on the learning objectives for the course. There may be one or more question for each learning objective. This means that the students may be tested on any part of the content contained in the Student Manual and accompanying course material.

Attendance and punctuality in all aspects of training are mandatory including assigned evening support group meetings. Attendance and participation marks are forfeited as follows:

  • Absence for each half hour – 1 mark deducted from participation.
  • Absence from Cultural Resource Evening – 5 marks deducted from participation. The required hours for this course are 45 contact hours.

Course Materials

  • Student Manual, Group Dynamics
  • Corey, Gerald and Schneider Corey, Marianne. Groups, Process and Practice. Sixth Edition. Pacific Grove, CA: Thomson Learning Inc., 2002.

ACT 4: Suicide Prevention and Grieving

Hours: 5 hours

Credits: 3 credits

Course Prerequisite: Community Addictions Training Certificate.

Professional Certification:

Graduates of this course may be eligible for certification through the Canadian Council of Professional Certification (CCPC) in cooperation with the Canadian Counsellors and Therapists.

Course Description:

The first part of the course will provide instruction to develop knowledge about symptoms of suicide and the skill development needed to conduct client assessments. Students will also be given time in class to practice skill development by conducting suicide assessment interviews in role-play exercises. The second part of the course focuses on the grieving process, working through the grieving process, and counseling a grieving client.

Purpose of Course:

This course is intended to do the following:

  • To provide students with general background knowledge on suicide; and suicide prevention; and grieving (bereavement support), focusing on:
    • suicide and grief as a personal experience, where applicable;
    • the specific components of suicide prevention, grief, and bereavement support.
  • To provide students with an opportunity to learn, discuss and demonstrate beginning skills in suicide prevention, through the risk assessment, and in bereavement support.

Course Expectations:

During this course, students will:

  • Examine their personal attitudes, feelings and values about suicide and grieving in order to separate these out from those of other systems: client’s agency’s, and community’s.
  • Consider suicide and grieving from both an Aboriginal and non‑Aboriginal perspective.
  • Actively participate in the in-class discussions and activities, and will complete all class related exercises and assignments, including the assessment.
  • Develop and enhance their suicide prevention and bereavement support skills through role plays, reading, supervision, personal sharing, ongoing professional development and, as needed, their own personal therapy.
  • Practice/demonstrate suicide risk assessment interview skills, including:
    • initiating contact with the client,
    • assessing the degree of suicidal risk,
    • demonstrating supportive listening, and
    • contracting with the client.
  • Explore their own grief issues and consider what they might need for their own healing.

Course Objectives

The objectives may be thought of as a road map of the learning journey ahead.  They indicate what the students can expect to learn during the course. They can also be used as a study guide when the students review what has been learned prior to completing the written assessment at the end of the course. The written assessment at the end of the course will be based on these objectives.

When the students have completed this course, they will be able to:

  1. Define suicide.
  2. Identify the four categories of suicide.
  3. Discuss relevant suicide statistics.
  4. Recognize and list the signs and symptoms of a person at risk for suicide.
  5. Name and explain the four stages of the Listening Model.
  6. Conduct a suicide risk assessment.
  7. Identify and list personal resources for high risk suicidal clients.
  8. Identify and list local resources for high risk suicidal clients.
  9. Discuss suicide prevention.
  10. Discuss suicide postvention protocol and rituals.
  11. Define bereavement, grief and mourning.
  12. List a variety of losses a person can experience.
  13. List several reactions to loss.
  14. Name the five stages of grieving.
  15. Explain the importance of grieving.
  16. List the seven bereavement support skills.
  17. Name the five basic parts of effective bereavement support and give the time focus for each part.
  18. Discuss emerging issues which may impact suicide and grieving.
  19. List several ways in which a person can help themselves through their loss.

Instructional Methods

  • Lecture
  • large and small group work and discussion
  • skill building through small group and individual exercises and role plays
  • suicide risk assessment role play
  • individual and small group homework assignments and readings
  • personal journaling
  • support groups
  • written assessment

Course Evaluation

  • Participation and Attendance 20%
  • Suicide Risk Assessment Exercise 30%
  • Written Assessment 50%
  • Total 100%

There will be a written assessment or test at the end of this course which will be used in part to determine the final grade. In this course, 50% of the final grade will be based on the written assessment score, 30% on the Suicide Risk Assessment exercise and 20% will be based on course participation and attendance. The risk assessment exercise is mandatory.  The written assessment or test will consist of a series of multiple choice questions which are based on the learning objectives for the course. There may be one or more question for each learning objective. This means that the students may be tested on any part of the content contained in the Student Manual and accompanying course material.

Attendance and punctuality in all aspects of training are mandatory including assigned evening support group meetings. Attendance and participation marks are forfeited as follows:

  • Absence for each half hour or portion thereof ‑ 1 mark deducted from participation.
  • Absence from Cultural Resource Evening ‑ 5 marks deducted from participation.
  • The required hours for this course are 45 contact hours.

Course Material

  • Student Manual, Suicide Prevention and Grieving
  • Friedman, Russell and James, John W. The Grief Recovery Handbook: The Action Program For Moving Beyond Death, Divorce, and Other Losses. Revised Edition. New York, NY: Harper Collins, 1998.
  • Schoeneck, Therese S. Hope for the Bereaved: Understanding, Coping and Growing Through Grief. A Handbook of Helpful Articles Written by Bereaved People for Bereaved People and Those Who Want to Help Them. Syracuse, NY: Hope For The Bereaved, Inc., 1995.

ACT 5: Culture and Traditional Values

Hours: 45 hours

Credits: 3 credits

 Course Prerequisite: Community Addictions Training Certificate.

 Professional Certification

Graduates of this course may be eligible for certification through the Canadian Council of Professional Certification (CCPC) in cooperation with the Canadian Counsellors and Therapists.

 Course Description

This course is intended to provide students with an opportunity to examine their own values and beliefs about traditional culture and spirituality. Students will have opportunities to participate in traditional spiritual ceremonies and to be able to ―openly‖ express their own views in a safe environment.

 Purpose of Course

This course is intended to do the following:

  • To provide students with an opportunity to explore how culture and traditional values impact their personal belief system.
  • To provide students with an opportunity to examine differing views of culture.
  • To provide students with an opportunity to explore the impact of other cultures on their own lives.

Course Objectives

The list of course objectives may be thought of as a road map of the learning journey ahead. They indicate what the students can expect to learn during the course.

When the students have completed this course, they will be able to:

  1. Identify their own values and relate them to:
  • their job
  • their family
  • their community
  • their personal life (relationship with self).
  1. Define the terms, culture and tradition.
  2. Explore the importance of cultural differences as they relate to their own lives.
  3. Identify negative and emerging issues in their lives and link them to a positive solution.
  4. Explore what a traditional sweat is.
  5. Explore and define the concept of gifts and identify their own and others.
  6. Explore the concept of healing and healers.
  7. Explore a method of spiritual inquiry as a tool of healing for themselves and others.

Instructional Methods

  • Lecture
  • Large and small group work and discussion
  • Skill building through small group and individual exercises and role plays
  • Individual and small group homework assignments and readings
  • Personal reflection and self-examination
  • ersonal journaling
  • Support groups

Course Evaluation

Attendance 10 %

Participation 70 %

Journaling 5 %

Support Group 15 %

There is no written exam in this course, however 70 % of the final grade will be based on active participation, 10 % will be based on attendance, 5 % will be based on journaling, and 15 % will be based on required support groups. Rubrics for marking participation will be used in assessing your final grade.

 Attendance and Participation (80%)

  • Attendance and punctuality in all aspects of training are mandatory including assigned evening support group meetings. Attendance and participation marks are forfeited as follows:
    • Absence for each half hour – 1 mark deducted from participation.
    • Absence from Cultural Resource Evening – 5 marks deducted from participation. The required hours for this course are 45 contact hours.

Support Group Guidelines (15%)

  • 5 points per group
  • 5 points will be deducted for time missed
  • Note: “Support Groups Are Not To Be Held During Lunch Hour”
  • Support groups are compulsory and are part of your required hours of training for the week.
  • You are to meet for one hour three times during the week for a total of three hours. Meetings times are after class preferably from 4:30-5:30 Monday-Thursday. As this is an important part of the learning process as well as skill building, the focus needs to be on the group members and not on other activities such as breakfast or lunch.
  • Each group is responsible for setting up their own group guidelines during their first session of each week based on their needs.
  • It is your responsibility to make time for support groups and any necessary arrangements made prior to scheduled support groups.
  • Each group will choose a team leader who will be responsible for keeping a record of attendance, which he/she will hand in to the trainer each Friday morning.
  • To gain the full benefits of support groups we suggest the following:
    • Utilize your communication skills i.e. attending, listening and if solicited practice feedback.
    • Keep in mind this is a support group and not a counselling session. If counselling is required, it is important to access professional resources outside of Nechi.
    • Use the time to debrief your day and be mindful of the time to allow all group members a chance to share.
    • Support groups to be held in a private area with respect for the person who is sharing and to ensure confidentiality.
    • What is shared in the support groups stays there and under no circumstances is it to be brought out; except in the case of disclosures of ―suicide, homicide and child abuse. In these circumstances please bring to the attention of your trainer as this will need to be reported to the proper authorities and provide referrals.

Learning Journal Guidelines (5%)

  • Journals handed in at the beginning of each day
    • 1 point per day
    • 1 point deducted each day a journal is not handed in.
  • Journal entries should be a half page to one page in length.
    • What was the experience during the day that was most significant? Please note the trainer may designate a topic.
    • Why it was significant?
    • What knowledge, skill and attitude have you gained through the experience or exercise?
    • What Actions you will take as a result?
    • What other thoughts, ideas, insights, feelings, new concepts and options might be explored?

COURSE MATERIALS

  • Student Manual, Culture and Traditional Values