INDIGENOUS ADDICTIONS SERVICES DIPLOMA

This new two (2) year diploma program is designed to provide students with an excellent academic addictions diploma and/or the credentials needed to pursue further post-secondary education opportunities.

Course pre-requisites include:

  • High school diploma with a grade of 50% in English 30-1 or 65% in English 30-2 or equivalent
  • Mature admission available for those over 21 who pass an English Equivalency Exam*

YEAR ONE COURSES

IASC 1001: Communication and Ethics I

Course Description:

This course examines the importance of ethical communication and techniques for the inclusion of effective communication skills for addiction counsellors. The course emphasizes the contextual realities of Indigenous peoples, and identity in relation to communication and ethics. Students will also review Indigenous responsibilities and practices (cultural protocols) as an approach for empowerment and health.

IASC 1002: Colonization, Decolonization and Healing

Course Description:

This course will examine through an Indigenous pedagogical framework the historical process of colonization, decolonization and healing. Students will research and explore decolonization methodologies throughout the world and assess contemporary issues in the healing process. Students will examine the meaning and impacts of colonization, decolonization, cultural survival, community and nation rebuilding.

IASC 1003: Human Development I

Course Description:

This course is designed to introduce students to Principles of Human Development from Applications drawn from both theoretical frameworks will be reviewed and practiced through experiential and hands on learning opportunities. Assignments will be based on these experiences and students will be encouraged to develop a practice model that considers the client’s worldview and conditions for enhancing their growth and development as individuals in early recovery from an addictive lifestyle.

IASC 1004: Health Inclusion: Across the Lifespan

Course Description:

The course will examine how colonization has affected our Indigenous populations by stigmatizing and marginalizing various sectors of the population. In particular it will review restorative healing methods utilizing Indigenous values of social responsibility and care for people within our circle.  Indigenous and Western best practices related to prevention, intervention and healing will be explored in the context of the aftermath of colonization and its impact on Indigenous populations.  Active Addiction; Concurrent Disorders; Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder; HIV/AIDS; Hepatitis C; grief and loss and other issues currently facing our communities will be examined in this course.  Through simulated practice experiences students will become familiar with specific resources to respond appropriately to client needs. Students are expected to demonstrate that their counseling is guided by relevant (population specific) principles and processes, that their selection and use of theory, models and frameworks is appropriate, and that their relationships reflect qualities suitably responsive to the needs, preferences and best interests of their clients.

IASC 1005: Physiology and Pharmacology of Drugs and Alcohol

Course Description:

This course will examine the pharmacology of current drugs of abuse, including their classification and effects. Students will have a basic understanding of the pharmacology of psychoactive drugs. The topics will include: a review of how addictions become another tool in the process of colonization; basic principles of pharmacology; pharmacokinetics; tolerance and dependence; dependence liability; therapeutic and toxic effects of specific psychoactive drugs.  Alcohol – specific signs and symptoms as indicated by assessment is covered as well.  Students will also learn pharmacological terms and concepts to conduct effective assessment, counselling, treatment and make appropriate referrals.

IASC 1006: Referral and Assessment

Course Description:

This course will broaden the students understanding of the assessment and treatment of addictions within Indigenous individuals, families and communities within the historical context of colonization with a more specific focus on multi-generational trauma.  The course will explore past and current practices related to principles of effective screening and assessment, including a broad range of western and holistic assessment instruments and procedures.   Practice simulations are used extensively to integrate the process and principles and prepare the students to apply them in Indigenous treatment centers and communities.

IASC 1007: Supportive Counselling Interventions

Course Description:

This course will explore Traditional Indigenous methods of healing, as well as explore contemporary counseling best practices.  The students will develop counseling techniques and skills to work with clients who are in the process of recovering from addictions and/or experiencing mental health issues. Students will examine relapse prevention models and also learn about the stages of recovery, how to identify the warning signs of relapse and how to assist clients in developing a relapse prevention plan. Students will develop skills to engage clients and family members in traditional teachings and healing practices based on mutually agreed upon goals and expectations of the counseling intervention process. Students will also engage in facilitating appropriate referrals and services when planning with a client.

IASC 1008: Treatment Planning

Course Description:

This course will enable the students to learn effective treatment practices and demonstrate the ability to evaluate, problem solve, set goals, and negotiate treatment plans with clients. In addition, the student will develop the skills to create effective client-counsellor contracts and action plans, including individualized treatment plans, evaluation, and management of treatment and or services using both Western and Indigenous practices. Furthermore, the students will be able to identify and utilize natural helping systems to facilitate counseling processes, effective resource utilization, client advocacy, involvement of family, community, and other support networks.

IASC 1009: Case Management & Record Keeping

Course Description:

This course is intended to enable students to manage a caseload and fulfill the functions, roles, referrals and expectations associated with the administration of the agency’s substance abuse program(s).  The student will be able to work within the policies, programs and regulations of the treatment setting, with a working knowledge of the community social services network, and the ability to engage in constructive working relationships with treatment teams.  Provision of educative and treatment services for family members, record keeping, and demonstrating an understanding of the professional addiction counselor’s mandate, competencies and boundaries are goals of this course.

IASC 1010: Harm Reduction & Aftercare

Course Description:

This course explores the enduring process of managing recovery and aftercare. Students will be introduced to a range of theories and models to better understand the process of change for individuals, families and communities, and how effective after-care strategies contribute to the healing, empowerment and growth of communities struggling with addiction as a product of multigenerational trauma.  The students will examine harm reduction policies and programs and research harm reduction strategies both nationally and internationally. The students will also look at current benefits and challenges in harm reduction programs compared to traditional abstinence based models.

YEAR TWO COURSES

IASD 2001: Communications & Ethics II

Course Description:

The student will develop effective listening, writing, and presentation skills necessary for positive communication when dealing with colleagues, clients, agency staff, community members, and the general public.

IASD 2002: Concurrent Disorders

Course Description:

This course will provide students with a basic understanding of dual diagnosis or concurrent disorders and explore knowledge, skills and strategies to help people living with both mental health and addictions issues.

 IASD 2003: Legal Advocacy

Course Description:

This course will provide students with a basic understanding of the relevant legal contexts concerning mental health and addictions services for Indigenous peoples.  Legal procedures and protocols for sharing information with other service providers and professional liability issues will be discussed. Relevant Federal and Provincial Legislation and Acts will be reviewed in order to provide students with knowledge of advocacy and how it can assist clients with getting the services that they need.

IASD 2004: Addictions, Mental Health, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

Course Description:

This course will examine current addiction, mental health and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and the relationship between these disorders. It will also explore the role of the addictions worker in the assessment, intervention and prevention of these disorders and examine the impact these disorders have had on individuals, families and communities, in particular, Indigenous people of Canada.

IASD 2005: Family and Addictions

Course Description:

Family counseling techniques strategies of balancing needs, facilitating family interactions and decision-making procedures are discussed. Effective models for working with substance abuse in the family and structural family therapy approaches will be studied. Skills in understanding the interrelationship between family systems, dependency and drug usage will be developed by the student. Students will also examine the multi‐generational effects of the Residential School System on the family system.

IASD 2006: Group Counselling

Course Description:

This course will provide students with a basic understanding of group counseling processes. Students will learn how to integrate Indigenous and mainstream approaches in conducting and evaluating meaningful group processes. The students will explore different group counseling approaches, group process theories, roles of the group facilitator and resolving conflict within the group.

IASD 2007: Grief and Loss

Course Description:

This course will look at a holistic approach and the effects of grief and loss on the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual well‐being of human beings. Students will examine historical and cultural perspectives of grief and loss as it relates to Indigenous peoples. A number of grief and loss theories will be examined including cultural loss, attachment issues, suicide and how these issues are related to Indigenous peoples with mental health and addictions issues. Various approaches to dealing with grief and loss issues will be discussed.

IASD 2008: Crisis Intervention

Course Description:

The content of this course provides an overview of crisis intervention strategies and possible outcomes experienced by individuals who face mental health and/or addictions.  The course will examine different approaches and theories in crisis intervention. The students will review a number of case studies and activities to assist them with developing and enhancing their skills in crisis intervention.

IASD 2009: Introduction to Health Promotion

Course Description:

This course will emphasize knowledge, skills and attitudes conducive to increasing potential for wellness and health. Activities directed towards increasing the overall level of well-being and actualizing the health potential of individuals, families, groups, and communities in general will be examined.  In today’s world there is an increasing need for a positive, constructive approach to health and wellness. There is a general shift in people’s priorities in health care because they are recognizing the benefits of living a healthy lifestyle.  They are recognizing the connection between the mind/body/spirit and engaging more in health enhancing behaviors, which not only impact on the body, but also on the attitudes which create a better framework for wellness or healing.

 IASD 2010: Evaluation of Community Based Programs

Course Description:

The study of the model of community development will precede the introduction of skills necessary to understand the principles of program evaluation. The course will provide basic tools in the evaluation of community based programs to aid in making administrative decisions in terms of operational and organizational issues. Students will explore options to address various risk factors and compare the impact of different social and ecological factors in community development. Students will develop knowledge and skills for social change, prevention, community facilitation and education.

IASD 2011: Year 2 Practicum

Course Description:

Students will demonstrate competency of the acquired theory from the classroom and practice this theory in the workplace.  This competency, as well as a demonstrated understanding of the link between all courses and the practicum will be articulated in the learning journal kept during the practicum as well as throughout the program.